More About This Website


ALIVE is a book presented as a blog series about human life from its inception. It studies the purpose of life, the philosophy of life, and the difference between physical life and spiritual life. The book does this by delving into the relationship between humankind and its invisible but highly active and involved Creator.

Based on Biblical narrative ALIVE enters major events and fleshes them out. In so doing ALIVE makes discoveries about the origins and evolution of human life.

ALIVE combines imagination and scriptual accuracy to develop the themes of what it means to be much more than physically ALIVE. Although imaginative, ALIVE never contradicts Scripture. Enjoy and learn.

The Bride's Year

This is a series of posts that make up a story describing the Year of The Church. The Church is The Bride of Christ who will be married to Him at The Wedding Feast of the Lamb as described in the Book of Revelations to John. The Wedding of Jesus Christ with the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church occurs after the destruction of this old earth and the inauguration of the new earth, also known as The Land of Immortality. 

It is a tale of a cynical little angel that God sent to earth to learn about the mystical year of synchronic time and about His Betrothed.

My writing offers readers a fresh way of looking at and learning about orthodox Christianity.

The style is intended to help the mind and heart overcome old prejudices and awaken them to the Truth of God’s plan for the human-gods that were created in His image and likeness.


About the Blog

This blog is for those who take the line in the Nicene Creed seriously that says, “I await the resurrection of the dead and the life of the ages to come.” That is the life immortal into which Jesus Christ will someday usher renewed humans. For centuries these people have been called Christians, and they are still called Christians, but since Christianity has become such a broad term and Christ said that the gate into immortal life is narrow and difficult to squeeze through, then perhaps those few serious people would be better identified as “Aspiring Immortals”.


This blog is a journal of just such an Aspiring Immortal. Through stories, poems, and journal entries I teach orthodox Christianity. I am not a religious rebel, instead I’d rather identify with GK Chesterton, CS Lewis, and my favorite Saints such as Francis of Assisi, Chrysostom, and Climacus whose vision and creativity have guided so many aspiring immortals through this earthly life.


A companion to this blog is my book entitled “The Immortal Life (TIL).” TIL teaches orthodox Christianity to those who want to know the reason for life and death, good and evil. TIL explains it all from the fall of mankind to the annihilation of this planet with a refreshing contemporary voice that is at times even funny.


We all work very hard to improve life on this planet for ourselves and for each other. And yet there is so much more life has to offer. Aspiring immortals are the salt of this earth and the substance of the next one.

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    ALIVE: Chapter 64, The Deal and a Meal


    At sunrise Moses awoke to find his wife gone. The boys were snoring, that bullhorn that heralds the abandonment of reality in deep sleep. He quietly crept out of the tent to look for her. In darkness, sound is magnified as if it is suppressed in the presence of holy light. Moses could barely hear her familiar sniffles of weeping and followed the thread to find Zipporah (Sepphora) crouched down behind a boulder in deep distress.


    “My dear, why do you weep? These are joyful days. The people are free!”


    “I miss my father, and my home. We are near Midian, I recognize the hills and I am tired of walking. These are not my people. I have no friends. I was not a slave, and they resent me for it. I am hungry.”


    Moses hugged his wife to envelope her in the only comfort he could offer. She soaked it up like the desert soaks up a flash of summer rain. Moses thought back on how much Sepphora endured, and how he had neglected her.


    “When the boys wake up, I will tell them to take you home. You are right; it is less than a two-day journey to Midian. Go to your father and tell him what the Lord has done. Take a messenger with you to bring us his news.”


    Sepphora hadn’t felt so calm and happy in weeks. She was jubilant as she hugged Moses and quickly left him to wake her sons and pack. Moses had enough to do; she was sure he would be well cared for by Miriam.


    Gersam and Eliezer grumbled at having to leave the group, but they knew they had to serve their mother and obey their father. Admittedly, they too looked forward to seeing their grandfather and friends again, and sleeping in their comfortable beds, and eating meat and vegetables.


    By noon, the troupe was off on their own journey home. Moses watched them walk away until they were reduced to speckles on the horizon. He commended them to the Lord’s care.


    That night, alone in his empty tent by the sweetened waters of Marah, Moses heard the voice of God loud and clear in his heart. The Lord had made for the people a statute and an ordinance. It was time to put them to the test.


    The next morning when everyone was awake and bustling around chatting and doing, Moses climbed onto a boulder to make his announcement. “The Lord says to you,” bellowed Moses, “If you will listen carefully to the voice of the Lord your God, and do what is right in His sight, and give heed to his commandments, and KEEP all his statutes, He will not bring upon you any of the diseases that He brought upon the Egyptians; ‘for He is the Lord who heals you.’ Now, it is time to move on! Fill your flasks with water and let’s go!”


    Moses said no more to the people that day. He allowed them to think about the words of the Lord as they packed up their tents and goods and quietly assumed their positions in the parade of refugees that followed Perambula in the cloud.


    “Who was this God who brings on diseases and heals?”


    “Where are we going? I am so hungry.”


    “What are these commands and statutes and ordinances that we should obey them? How can we obey what we don’t know?”


    Every day brought more unfamiliar experiences, thoughts, and places. If it can be said that Israel was reborn in the Red Sea, it was now in the toddler stage of wonder and learning.


    Moses descended the boulder and began packing with the rest. He also never knew where they were going, or what would happen from one day to another. ‘There it is’ he thought, ‘the deal. From this moment on the Lord will let us know the conditions for His blessings, and the consequences if we refuse the conditions. There is no wasteland in between where these people can ignore the Lord and live in peace. The world is too dangerous a place for that.’


    Moses and Aaron assumed their place at the head of the mass of refugees, and Perambula in the cloud took position too. They walked and thought, walked and talked, walked and wept.


    By dusk the nation of God stopped to set up camp once again.


    The following morning Israel saw the beauty of the place they were lead to. A young girl proudly counted 70 palm trees and ran around cheerily announcing her discovery. As the young bucks explored their new home, one after another found a spring of fresh clean water. When it was clear that there were many springs, Aaron assigned one to each tribe. Coincidentally there were just enough, twelve.


    This blissful, almost surreal place would have been good enough for eternity, except their bellies growled.  Each day that went by Israel had less to eat. Mothers worried, fathers grew grumpier.


    After three days walk through the desert wilderness, Moses decided it was time to move on to distract themselves from the hunger and to see if they could find food along the way, although everyone knew that was unlikely in this desert wasteland.


    Six weeks had passed since they had left their cozy homes. Curious thoughts turned bitter with heat and hunger.  The worried mothers and grumpy fathers joined forces to become a complaining mob that was mystically reduced to the one man, Israel. Israel barked at Moses and Aaron, “If only we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger!” Frail people fainted.


    With furrowed brow Moses looked into the hostile eyes of Israel fearing what could happen. The thought of mass suicide, like an oncoming baseball came hurling at Moses who reflexively batted it away with all his might. At that intense moment the Lord appeared and said to Moses, “I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day. This is how I will test them, whether they will follow My instructions or not. On the sixth day, when they prepare what they bring in, it should be twice as much as they gather on other days, so they may observe My day of rest and not harvest food on the Sabbath.”


    Moses through Aaron made the announcement of relief and providence, “In the evening you shall know that it was the Lord who brought you out of the land of Egypt and in the morning you shall see the glory of the Lord, because He has heard your complaining. For what are we, that you complain against us, but the Lord!”


    Moses walked away in disgust. He entered his empty tent, and took a nap to escape the ungrateful, short-sighted mob.


    When he awoke in the evening Moses emerged from his tent to find the whole camp covered with quails and boys and girls and mothers and fathers chasing and capturing them. Others were lighting fires with the brush and anything they could find to burn. That evening Israel feasted for the first time since they ate the Passover lamb. And they went to their sleep with full bellies and content hearts. But no one, not even one person out of the thousands who were fed approached Moses to apologize for complaining and doubting him.


    In the morning one tent after another emptied out of people who found a light dew hovering throughout the land. When the dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance, as fine as frost on the ground. When the Israelites saw it they said, “What is it?”


    Moses replied, “It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat. Gather as much of it as each of you needs, an Omer to a person according to the number of persons, all providing for their own tents. But only take enough for one day! One day ONLY, do you hear me! This is your daily bread! The day before the Sabbath you will gather enough for two days so you may obey the Sabbath rest.”


    The people took every vessel they could find and gathered the flaky substance. It was delicious! It tasted like wafers and honey. The first day that Israel ate manna the joy of relief spread through the hungry nation like wildfire. Chatting turned to chewing. Chewing and humming approvals like the sound of happy hummingbird wings sucking juicy nectar.


    ALIVE Chapter 63 The Paradox of HOH

    Safely on shore, Israel rejoiced as no nation has rejoiced together ever before or ever since. Songs of gratitude to the Lord poured out of happy hearts. Their God was more powerful than Pharaoh! Whole bodies erupted in celebratory dance for hours and hours. A contagion of laughter and hugs swept through people who had been strangers a week earlier. A mass of berated and abused slaves had miraculously become a huge family with a common endowment.


    By morning, Israel, having petered out, simply wondered what marvel would happen next.


    The second day of freedom was calmer. More food preparation, less dancing. Freedom had begun to settle in. It was more natural and less of a shock.


    Moses found a boulder to climb on so he could be seen and heard, and standing on it he announced to his vast crowd of refugees that the journey to their new home, the Promise Land, would commence the following day. “Get plenty of rest tonight. We have left our bricks and straw and our taskmasters with their whips. We owe Egypt nothing more for its food. Egypt has been paid in full! Let us forge ahead and follow the cloud to our new homes where we may raise our children and build our communities working for each other and for ourselves. Follow me!”


     And so they did. Like a swarm of earthbound flies, like a great army of humanity young and old men, with their women, and their children, their animals and with every thing they owned walked to find the land of their own. Israel journeyed over field and desert and into the wilderness of Shur.


    For three long hot days and two short cold nights Israel walked in dry  wilderness. Loud chattering settled into a muffled roar of shuffling feet; even the animals trudged along without voice. There was less and less to say; each morsel of life wanted to conserve his or her energy with silence. Feet grew tough, even children’s feet became as tough as leather. Israel was united as one body walking. Not since Israel was one man, Jacob, had Israel been so contained and so aware of its God.


    Gersam and Eliezer enjoyed their position in the lead. “Look!” shouted Gersam, “Water!!! The young bucks all ran up to the pond and scooped up the water with their ready hands, only to spit it out!


    “Ptouie!” Moses caught up and looked curiously at his sons. “What’s wrong?”


    “This water is bitter!” said Gersam.


    “It is undrinkable,” added Eliezer between spits.


    In syncopated rhythm most of the thirsty people complained to Moses whom they came to regard as their highly paid tour guide, “What shall we drink?” Their complaints tasted as bitter as the water to the ears of Moses.


    Moses wincing, looked up into the heavens and cried out, “Lord! What shall I do? Your people need water to drink and this pond is as poison to them?”


    “Tch tch” said Gracefeld as the angel made its spirit way over to Perambula to speak. Perambula peeked out from the cloud to meet Gracefeld in the air and answered, “What’s that for?”


    “The Lord seems to have a real issue with water, and I wonder if these poor people are alert enough to figure it out for themselves.” Said Gracefeld.


    “Do you mean death and life?” Asked Perambula.


    “Of course! I think some angel must have poisoned this lake while we weren’t looking to remind and teach them. First, the Flood annihilates life, then first born babies are drown in the Nile, then the marvels begin with the bloody Nile, and end with the parting of the Red Sea that killed the enemy.” 


    “Yes the water is the means of death, needed to sustain life. It’s a paradox.” replied pleased Perambula. “But no Gracefeld. These people are simply thirsty. They don’t need philosophy, the need drink.”


    Gracefeld shrugged angel wings and watched.


    As Moses stood by the bitter waters listening attentively for a reply from the Lord, the message welled up in his soul, “Look there, that wood. Pick it up and fling it into the water.” Moses picked it up and looked curiously at it.


    Perambula gasped! Gracefeld smiled. The angels which flow as freely through time as through air recalled the future day when God’s Son died on wood, and while still hanging went into Hades to release the dead who were there. “Wood will be the medium through which God restores life, not water!” exclaimed  Perambula cheerfully feeling wise, “The wood removed the bitterness from the water as it will someday remove the bitterness of death from life.”


    Gracefeld completed the equation by adding, “so that the water can be the agent of life again, because of WOOD!”


    Perambula feeling as wise as God added, “Reversing the power of The Flood, the drowning of the firstborn, and the drowning of the enemy army! It’s brilliant! Wood renders life more powerful than death.”


    Gracefeld submerged in the part, topped it off by proclaiming, “By wood, I render thee, oh precious water, life giving again!”


    God looked on smiling that His angels, His hard working angels were enjoying some merriment too, and didn’t dare disturb them.


    Moses hurled the wood into the pond. After the splash, they all watched the concentric circles radiate outward. When the pond was still again, Moses walked toward the edge of it, bent down and under thousands of watchful eyes, scooped some of the lake into a metal cup for a taste.


    Eliezer and Gersham looked at their father in awe with the taste of bitterness still on their tongues.


    “It’s good now. Sweet as honey. Taste it, I kid you not. Tell the people to fill up their water bottles, and then let’s all bathe. We certainly need this water by now!” And in jest he added, “especially you Gersam!”


    After everyone had their fill of water, and then their baths, they sat patiently by the lake waiting for the last one to be done. No one noticed that the Lord their God kept enemy tribes away so they could walk in peace. They simply did not know how protected they were in this land surrounded by violent people, the likes of which they had never encountered in their slavish isolation.


    While  Israel squeezed every last ounce of relief and satisfaction and cleanliness from the lake, every molecule of life, they set up camp for the last night by the sweet waters of Marah .


    That night Moses lay next to Zepporah in their tent, with their boys snoring loudly and prayed. “Lord, when may I see Your face?” In the silence of the Lord’s reply, Moses slowly and smoothly slipped into a sound, yet soundless, sleep.


    ALIVE: Chapter 62 The Holy Baptism of Israel


    Genesis 32:28


    Then the man said, “You shall no longer be called Jacob, but Israel, for you have striven with God and with humans, and have prevailed.”


    “Evangeline.” whispered an ethereal little voice.


    “Who said that?” I replied.


    “It’s me, Gracefeld; how can you not recognize my voice since you are who gave me voice?”


    Trying to act nonchalant, I said to the air, “Ah! Gracefeld, nice to meet you; what is it?”


    “I must point out that in Chapter 6, you fell short of your objective;” answered the angel sternly, then added, “how could you write about the crossing of the Red Sea in only one or two paragraphs? Take your readers in there. Let them feel the spray of water on their faces; let them know that it wasn’t just a mere escape, but rather a mass baptism of Israel the likes of which the world has never seen and will never see again. Now get to work!”


    “Wait, don’t go!” I begged. “Why do you call it a baptism? Did they ask for it? Did they seek to repent of their sins; did the crossing remit their sins?”


    “My dear, you have so much to learn.” replied Gracefeld sympathetically. “You of all people remember the iconic baptism which was Noah in the ark. Did they repent? John’s baptism used repentance as the reason for the people’s rebirth, for their transformation into children of the most high God.


    Baptism is rebirth. Even Christ knew He needed a rebirth, the mark of a new life and was voluntarily baptized. You know almost nothing about His life before, because it had been so different. There wasn’t anything to say about it. Christ mandated baptism because the second birth is as vital to immortality as the first was to mortality. 


    The people Israel, each one of them individually and together as a nation, via water were reborn, just as Noah’s family was reborn, just as you were reborn as an infant. 


    After the miraculous crossing, there was no turning back for Israel, as there is no reentering the womb, as Noah’s family could not return to the old world. Illuminate the event as you do. One or two paragraphs! What a failure on your part!”


    “Wait! Will you help me?”


    “Not me, no. Don’t fret, the words will come as surely as that sun arrives to erase the darkness you start out in every morning. Yield yourself to the words. I must go and assume my own position in the story. Treat me kindly please.”


    “Wait! As long as you are here, I have a burning question.”


    “Okay, but ask me quickly. You really should wake up earlier you know.”


    “I know. Sh. Isn’t it peculiar to call a whole nation after one man? Israel. It’s like calling a country Harvey.” I asked as succinctly as I could.


    “Ah! We don’t have the time to discuss the concept of ‘out of one many, and out of many one!’ You’re American. Think about it! Israel was named by God. He is a man, he is a plethora of man, he is a country. He strives with God and man, and prevails. Israel grew from the seed that was one man and then twelve tribes and from there, a nation. And today, he is baptized in the Red Sea to mark his rebirth in God’s will. Now get on with it!” And as mysteriously as Gracefeld appeared, the angel vanished and I was left to go back to the Red Sea just as we were about to cross it...again.





    Perambula in the pillar of cloud lead the exodus of thousands of Israelites out of Egypt. They were as loud as a giant swarm of bees. Children whined, ladies chattered, cows mooed, dogs barked, roosters crowed, thousands of feet shuffled. Perambula in the pillar started in a straight line out of their homes in Goshen.


    “Perambula!”called God to His angel.


    “Yes Lord, how am I doing?”

    “I want you to steer this group around, send it back towards the sea at Pihahiroth; I will let Moses know that it’s okay. I want the Egyptian army to think we are wandering aimlessly, but I don’t want Moses to think that.”


    “May I ask You why we can’t just take the straight and faster route to get out of here before the army of Pharaoh overtakes us? I admit that I am a little concerned for these people. They are difficult to steer.”


    God wondered when to inform His angel of His grand plan and then said, “Trust me angel; I am about to shock both Israel and Egypt one last time to prove that I am the Lord God who is freeing Israel from the bonds of his oppressor. Now take that cloud to the sea!”


    “Yes, my Lord.” and with that Perambula pushed and blew until the luminous cloud made a giant u-turn. The sounds of chattering grew louder and louder still as the mass, one person after another commented with curiosity and skepticism on the change in direction.


    The appearance of wandering had its desired affect. “My Lord!” In rushed a courtier into Pharaoh’s throne room disturbing his moaning and fretting. “I bring a good report!”


    Pharaoh looked up as a man starving for good news, about to breathe his last.


    “The Israelites are lost! They don’t seem to have any idea of where to go, and they have ended up in front of the sea. They have cornered themselves!”

    “That is good news. We must fetch them and bring them back immediately. They have had enough of their freedom. They don’t even know what to do with it. And they must be thirsty by now too. Israel will be easy prey.” said Pharaoh with the glee of a salivating lion.  “Assemble the entire army and prepare my chariot. We are going to bring back our delinquents! Didn’t they ask for only three days! Meet me in front of the palace. Be quick about it!”


    Pharaoh’s despondency turned to ebullience. Thoughts of his dead son burrowed deep in his soul, so deep they were forgotten by his mind. He was now the conquering general about to lead his army to victory. A rag-torn adversary against the greatest army civilization has known was an unfair match, but that didn’t diminish Pharaoh’s thrill of pursuit. It only made it stronger because he knew that he would win this time.


    Within an hour every horse and chariot in the army, in full uniform, with polished spears and bayonets and with Pharaoh in the lead were galloping to the sea, fueled by exhilaration and confidence.


    Israel on the outskirts of the mass, heard the thunder of horses hooves and looked at the horizon to see the army in hot pursuit. Fear and panic spread through the crowd like a virus. “We are doomed!” cried a sixty year old Reubenite.


    “Let’s surrender quickly before we are harmed, and return to serve him. It wasn’t such a bad life. Heads nodded in agreement as the decision to surrender became consensus among the tribes.


    By the time that opinion reached the ears of Moses who stood closest to the sea, he too wondered what to do. Suppressing his concern, Moses said, “Don’t be afraid, see what the Lord will do. The Lord will fight for you, keep still.” But to the Lord Moses sang a different song. He looked around for options and saw none. Then he said, “Lord, your cloud cornered us. How can we escape? Did you lead us here only to be slaughtered?”


    “Why are you crying out to Me.” replied the Lord.”Lift up your staff, stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it so Israel can walk on dry ground.”


    ‘Divide the sea?’ thought Moses, but he caught himself before adding, “That’s impossible!”


    Instead, Moses took a deep breath, looked up into the heavens for a sign; saw none, lifted his right arm with hand clenched around the staff. Suddenly a mighty wind, a wind never before and never again to be duplicated swept up from the east. Small objects took flight. Mother’s clutched their infants. Chickens squawked. The sun fell onto the horizon.  It was surreal. But the wind also mysteriously blew away fear and complaints.


    Perambula and Gracefeld repositioned their pillars of cloud and fire from the lead to behind Israel to form a rampart nestling Israel into a safe and secure space from which man, woman, and child could regain their composure. Perambula filled the clouds with bright light so Israel could see with daylight eyes the widening path created at his million feet. 


    All night long Perambula and Gracefeld held back Pharaoh’s army so it could not reach Israel.


    Israel walked in dusky light through the Red Sea corridor with watery walls spraying a refreshing mist onto the faces of the numb multitude while the mighty wind roared to push the people through and blow away any inkling of trepidation that would have made them surrender to their familiar taskmasters.








    Moses, his brother and sister, his wife and sons lead the congregation of Israel on the miraculous trek through the sea. It was the iron clad  faith of one man, Moses, that caused a chain reaction so strong that faith grew and grew as it was passed down the line to the very last family. Men, their wives and children felt the soggy earth beneath their feet. It was like walking on the narrow wet sea shore without the wide dry beach to go to.


    The wind that formed the magical corridor was created by a plethora of powerful spirits. It was a warm wind, and it pushed the mass of marchers along through the sea so that no one felt resistance, but rather as if he or she was being swept through. 


    “Look ahead!” shouted Moses. “Do not look at the water! Pass it down.”


    Echoes of, “Look ahead! and Faces front!” echoed through a mile of souls. The people were too numb to entertain doubts that they would make it through. Even the most stubborn skeptic didn’t dare doubt that he would make it to the other side of the sea.


    Moses who had experienced many supernatural events since the day that God spoke to him from the burning bush was confident that God had created this temporary highway to freedom, this short cut to safety just for them. Every step of the way detached the people from Pharaoh, in body and in soul.


    Eliezer clutched the bundle of bones of Joseph close to his heart. Gersam and a band of young men stood on the sidelines as the people passed shouting the message, “Look ahead! Don’t look at the water!”


    Moses was glad it was night time when the darkness made it easier to be blind to the weird corridor walls. The warm and  mighty wind at their backs was the Spirit of God-almighty Who was creating a way where there was no way. He was shepherding His precious people through the valley of the shadow of death for the first time.


    Miriam was among the first to reach the beach. The sight of miles of shore to her left and right made her heart skip.  She took a few deep breaths to try to regulate it again. Long red streaks appeared in the dark night sky. The sun was about to rise. She was an old woman, more than ninety years of age, but she wept like a baby. Aaron held her arm, and said, “Come sister, there is a rock, let me take you to sit. It will be a long time before the rest of the people arrive. You may even want to try to sleep.”


    “Thank you Aaron, I could no more sleep than I could do cartwheels right now. Yes, take me to that rock.”


    Every minute that went by more and more people arrived. Cows and oxen, chickens and sheep too were mixed in with the rich families of Israel.


    “Look at the sun mommy!”shouted a little girl with glee. Indeed daybreak heralded the arrival of the pilgrims to the eastern shore.


    “Move back, don’t linger here, make room for more people! Move back!” A few young men took it upon themselves to usher the pilgrims onto dry ground. First steps out of the sea were like taking first steps on the Moon. The relief of arrival and wonder at new surroundings was commonly felt by young and old.


    Meanwhile, just as the sun filled the sky with day, the Lord and Perambula and Gracefeld in their pillars of fire and cloud looked down upon the Egyptian army still in pursuit of Israel.  By then pharaoh’s army was deep into the corridor of the sea, closing in on the older Israeli stragglers. Suddenly, God through the Egyptians into a panic. He clogged their chariot wheels so they turned with difficulty.


    Terror swept through the army of Pharaoh. A soldier shouted, “Let’s flee, for the Lord is fighting with them!” Realization that they were in pursuit of the God who killed their firstborn terrified them.


    While horses were being whipped to pull their chariots out of the mud, and the Israelites were all safely on the eastern shore, the Lord instructed Moses to stretch out his hand over the sea. Moses peered into the path of their salvation to see in the distance the struggling pursuers and slowly lifted his hand clenching the staff.


    The walls of the magical path melted to erase the highway of the salvation of Israel. Within twenty five minutes the sea returned to its normal depth. Several of the heartiest soldiers which had almost made the crossing washed up on shore, as dead as their drowned compatriots whose bodies were being tossed by the current. Not an enemy was left to threaten God’s people.


    Thousands of wide Israeli eyes looked back to stare at their path as it slowly submerged under water. Some saw in the distance arms and legs flailing and heard horses neighing and chariots breaking.


    That which they didn’t dare to fear, drowning, was befalling the army of Pharaoh. That which they convinced themselves would not happen, was indeed happening to those who would have captured them.


    As in the days of Noah, water was the cause of death and new life. All of Israel began its new free life with baptism in the bloody Red Sea.


    Perambula and Gracefeld with a congregation of sub-angels wafted through the party soaking in the joy and blowing away random evil spirits that would spoil the moment.


    They laughed. They danced. They cried. They sang new songs. Miracle of miracles.


    Two days of merriment gave God’s nation time to catch their breath and continue their journey east to the land that was promised to Father Abraham centuries before, and to them.


    Israel was renewed.


    “Now, that’s more like it, Evangeline.” whispered Gracefeld. And I smiled, relieved to be approved by one of my favorite, most respected angels.












    ALIVE: Chapter 61 The Grand Eviction

    Miriam looked up into the starry sky as if searching for the face of the Lord to thank Him for freedom. In all her years Miriam had never stepped even one toe out of Egypt; she had rarely left her neighborhood. Relief and haste rising from Hebrew hearts permeated the air so that even the dumb animals and youngest babes and toddlers felt an incomprehensible sense of relief that finally Pharaoh let them go. They had to leave fast before he changed his mind again.


    The Egyptians, left behind, sat in their homes and in the gathering squares glad to be getting rid of the cause of so much suffering. The God of these people who served them for generations had appeared with a vengeance causing much more harm than those people were ever worth.


    Mothers and fathers were still mourning the death of their first born. Grieving hearts craved the exodus of Israel, the murderer. They gladly parted with their jewelry of silver and gold and with their finest clothing to be rid of Joseph’s God. They were a plundered people without anger or regret for it. Some Egyptians wanted an end to the days of calamity, others routed for Israel to beat Pharaoh. Even children joined in the thrill of expelling the Israelites. Those who thought about the extra work figured it would help them forget the devastation they had endured.


    “Get out! Go away from here. Now. Tonight! Just go! Don’t wait for your dough to rise. Take your bowls of dough and your flocks and livestock and your first born. Take our silver and gold and clothing and leave us. Never return!” shouted the elders in unison. “Go before Pharaoh recovers from his grief.”


    Young men went in packs through Goshen knocking on doors and demanding that Israel leave immediately. A great commotion was stirring as families hastily packed up their possessions to obey the Egyptians and their own hearts that yearned to flee from familiar cages. Bellies still full of the sacrificial lamb would have to wait a long time for another feast. Dough in bread bowls couldn’t rise with all the commotion, but would have to be rolled out and baked later in makeshift ovens.


    How many times had Pharaoh told them they could leave? How many times had they packed and formed their groups and exit strategy? Never had it been so rushed and chaotic. Foreigners clung to Israelites to escape Egypt with them. The elders allowed only those who were circumcised, or willing to be circumcised to join them.


    As he marshaled his own family Moses became hyper-aware of the significance of this night, and that future generations must experience however possible this holiest of nights when their One True God set them free. The vigil of this night must be kept throughout their generations. The lamb with bitter herbs, the unleavened bread, the prayers; each generation of Israel must remember this moment of relief and the presence of their mighty God.


    The Lord said to Moses, Consecrate to Me all the firstborn; whatever is the first to open the womb among the Israelites, of human beings and of animals, is Mine.


    Moses said to the people, “Remember this day on which you came out of Egypt, out of the house of slavery, because the Lord brought you out from there by strength of hand; no leavened bread shall be eaten. Today, in the month of Abib, you are going out. When the Lord brings you into the land of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites, which he swore to his ancestors to give you, a land flowing with milk and honey, you shall keep this observance in this month.


    Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, and on the seventh day there shall be a festival to the Lord. You shall tell your children on that day, ‘It is because of what the Lord did for me when I came out of Egypt. You shall keep this ordinance at its proper time from year to year.’


    Perambula and Gracefeld met with the Lord to review the route of the migrants. Gracefeld was to lead them by night as a pillar of fire, and Perambula by day in a pillar of cloud so that they might travel day and night. They would not take the direct route, but rather a circuitous path to avoid war. The people weren’t ready for that yet.


    Eliezer felt so much more alive than ever before. Experiencing the favor of the Lord during all those calamities, he was shocked when they were happening to the Egyptians and not to them, not to him. It seemed to him that his life before coming to Egypt and being a Jew was merely mechanical. He had the same body that needed to sleep and eat, that got angry and sad, happy and mischievous, but seeing that their God answered prayers for freedom, he had begun to pray. Every night as he lay in bed waiting for sleep to come over him, he spoke to God, told him how he felt, asked him for guidance, and for protection. From time to time  there were indications that he was heard!


    Since he seemed to be communicating with this great God, Eliezer felt different! More like a real person and not just an animal with language and emotions. Knowledge of God made life exciting and safe at the same time.


    Eliezer was proud of His father. Every morning when he woke up, Eliezer was excited to see what miracles the day would bring. Even though he was from Midian and well travelled compared to the rest of them, he anticipated the exodus with joy and gladness. He was ready for anything, because he knew that their God, His God, was leading them to a fine new home.


    Eliezer was very glad to leave Egypt, probably gladder than the Israelites. Slavery meant something very different to him. It was humiliating to be treated so inhumanely. He had been robbed of his humanity by force. He had been treated as an animal only for his physical usefulness. Moses and his grandfather Jethro always treated him with kindness and respect. Eliezer knew what it meant to be free and he knew the appalling difference. How grateful he was to be free again. He wondered how many lives had been spent from birth to death in these 400 years with no inkling of the difference. The Israelites, he feared, would have a huge adjustment to make. In fact, he didn’t know how they would react to freedom with its responsibilities and risks. Many of the people that he met did not want to leave their homes; slavery trained them to grumble over every command.


    “Eliezer, stop daydreaming!” shouted Moses to his son. “Come here. The elder Baruch has given me this precious  bundle, which is the bones of our patriarch, Joseph. You will carry them out of Egypt.”


    Eliezer walked closely behind his father, solemnly embracing the Patriarch Joseph. What an honor! There was a man doubly blessed by God, with wisdom and intelligence, and with favor. When they reached Baal-zephon Eliezer carefully set his holy bundle down in the care of his mother Sepphora and helped to set up camp opposite it by the sea.


    The Lord could not resist orchestrating one last event, a grander finale more positive than the death of the first-born, more astonishing than the million frogs, lest anyone ever forget that it was God and not Pharaoh who set Israel free.


    In the comfort of his palace far far away from the hubbub of his poor grieving people, Pharaoh was told that indeed all of Israel had left, not a soul remained in Egypt to work. With their exodus, he lost power, wealth, and respect. The humiliation was worse than the grief caused by the death of his cherished son. This God, this immaterial magician had stripped Pharaoh of everything that had been the almighty leader of the greatest country in the world. “What have we done, letting Israel leave our service?” thought Pharaoh, “but I still have an army.”


    In a vain attempt to recover, Pharaoh shouted for his officials. “Israel has been gone long enough! Surely by now their worship is over. Go and make ready my chariot and my army. We must bring them back immediately! Take chains and ropes to tie up the resisters!”


    The captain was glad to see his leader aback to normal. The Egyptian elite were concerned about the new world order.


    Soon, six hundred picked chariots and all the other chariots of Egypt with officers over all of them and Pharaoh went in hot pursuit of Israel.


    Swift Arabian horses and chariots rode to the campsite by the sea where it was reported that Israel had foolishly cornered themselves, making it oh so easy to round up.


    When Israel heard them and then saw the great mass of Egyptians advancing on them, in great fear they cried out to Moses, “was it because there were no graves in Egypt that you have taken us away to die in the wilderness? What have you done to us, bringing us out of Egypt? Is this not the very thing we told you in Egypt? Let us alone and let us serve the Egyptians. For that is better than to die in the wilderness.”


    Moses replied to the people, “Do not be afraid! Stand firm, and see the deliverance that the Lord will accomplish for you today; for the Egyptians that you see today, you shall never see again. The Lord will fight for you, you only have to keep still.”


    Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why do you cry out to Me? Tell the Israelites to go forward. But you lift up your staff, and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, that Israel may go into the sea on dry ground. Then I will harden the hearts of the Egyptians so that they will go in after them; so I will gain glory for myself over Pharaoh, His chariots, and his chariot drivers.”


    Then Perambula who had been leading Israel, in his pillar of cloud, moved and went behind the mass of people. Perambula took the position between the armies of Israel and Egypt. The angel shined in the cloud and separated the two armies throughout the night.


    Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea. The Lord drove the sea back by a strong east wind all night, and turned the sea into dry land; and the waters were divided. The Israelites went into the sea on dry ground, the waters forming a wall for them on their right and on their left. The Egyptians pursued, and went into the sea after them, all of Pharaoh’s horses, chariots, and chariot drivers.


    At the morning watch the Lord in the pillar of fire (with Gracefeld) and cloud (with Perambula) looked down upon the Egyptian army, and threw them into panic. He clogged their chariot wheels in the mud so that they turned with difficulty. The Egyptians shouted, “Let us flee from the Israelites, for the Lord is fighting for them against Egypt.”


    Then the Lord said to Moses, “Stretch out your hand over the sea, so that the water may come back upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots and their chariot drivers.”


    So Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and at dawn the sea returned to its normal depth. As the Egyptians fled before it, the Lord tossed the Egyptians into the sea. The waters returned and covered the chariots and the chariot drivers, of the entire army of Pharaoh that had followed them into the sea; not one of them remained. But the Israelites walked on dry ground through the sea, the waters forming a wall for them on their right and on their left.


    Thus the Lord saved Israel that day from the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead on the seashore. Israel saw the great work that the Lord did against the Egyptians. So the people feared the Lord and believed in the Lord and in his servant Moses, for about an hour.


    ALIVE: Chapter 60, Mid-Tale Thoughts


    Some scholars say the Passover story is not historical. Only God knows for sure. Nevertheless, it has happened for billions of people in the reading and telling of it in annual commemorations whether or not thousands of frogs ever hopped into Egyptian beds and all the rest. Obviously, God wants us to know the Passover story for a good reason which makes Passover as real in our minds as the moon landing.


    The ALIVE account of the Passover offers imagined details that evoke the rich meaning, and therefore the purpose of the story.


    The Passover is the second major work of God in a triptych designed to gradually restore His people to the state of human origin in which we clearly reflected His image and likeness, when we were designed to have dominion over nature with its decay, malfunction (illness), and natural death.


    We became subject to the cycle of nature (e.g. childbirth pain, difficulty farming, death) when Eve, then Adam believed the lie that God was not trustworthy, and then ate of the poisonous tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The Creation story may be an allegory too, but that doesn’t make it any less meaningful.


    They were forbidden to eat of that tree for God’s good reason. Adam and Eve were originally in the world but not of it. Jesus showed us what that means. He was in the natural world, but not of it, because like Adam and Eve, He had dominion over nature as demonstrated by the many miracles.


    Distrust opened the floodgate of good and evil, which could only be mitigated by exhibiting extraordinary faith, as demonstrated by Noah and Abraham. Faith looks at evil and sees the good hiding behind it. Faith ignores both to seek God’s mysterious will.


    The Flood, the Passover, and the Resurrection take God’s chosen people, step by step to a new Promise Land, revealed by the Apostle John in his revelation, where we will live in incorruptible bodies, and once again enjoy dominion over nature.


    For those of us who wonder why God allows evil, the answer is that once upon a time He didn’t. Yet, the Flood tells us that annihilating everything was a short term solution, but key.


    Making children of God, through God’s will and man’s cooperation is an ambitious project, particularly in the face of such great opposition.


    First step. Noah’s Flood defined the essential elements of life, which are salvation, baptism, and mercy.


    When wondering about salvation imagine those who drowned outside the ark. Drowning is easier to picture than Armageddon.


    Baptism signifies death and rebirth. Everyone died in the Flood except Noah and his family who were reborn through the combustion of equally intense fear and faith. As with Noah’s family, true life begins, not in the oblivion of natural birth, but rather with the will to be in the ark of salvation from the doomed world. One appropriates the powerful and meaningful event through re-enactment, as though it is happening for the first time, and for the same purpose.


    The concept of mercy is perfectly defined by the olive branch presented by the dove. Ελέησον. The Greek word for mercy literally means to olive me. Stop. Clear your mind of all noise, and imagine intense of relief after 180 days at sea. Imagine being the only life form on the entire planet, and you are starving and scared, and then you see a dove approach you with an olive branch. Hallelujah!!! Noah and his family were given mercy and they received relief. Ask for mercy to receive relief from your suffering or to prevent punishment. Olive oil is the manifestation of a powerful concept, God-bestowed relief. Keep in mind too, the months of faith and suffering before the olive branch appeared. Patience is a virtue. To touch your forehead, the shell of your mind, with Holy Water, or olive oil (Holy Unction) is a flashback.


    As big and meaningful as The Flood was, it would be as a fleck of gold buried deep in the earth had it not been for Passover.


    Passover opened the gilded altar doors to reveal God to all His people. Passover was as God’s third beginning. The Creation birthed man, the Flood baptized him, the miracles of Passover ushered the sons of God into a new world in communion with Him.  


    When the angel of death passed over the blood-stained doorways, it was as if the olive branch appeared after four hundred years.


    Four hundred years in Egypt made the descendants of Jacob into a solid nation. Slavery bound them together, lest in freedom they scatter throughout the earth and were dissolved. The hardening of Pharaoh’s heart and the nine calamities gave this nation time and conditions to pry them loose from the mold of an Egyptian slave.


    The epic story starts with the bloody Nile to recall the days when Pharaoh drowned the Hebrew baby boys in the Nile. Only Moses was saved from the deadly Nile as if baptized to begin life anew as the grandson of Pharaoh. The bloody Nile echoed the Flood. Again, baptism initiates a new different kind of life.


    To explain His purpose for the Passover God tells Moses that He will:

         1         Free them from the burdens of the Egyptians

         2         Deliver them from slavery

         3         Redeem them

         4         Take them as His people

         5         Be their God

         6         Bring them to the Promise Land

         7         Give it to them, that they may know that He has...

         8         Freed them (past tense, as if it already happened)

         9         Keep His promise.


    During the worst of times during the last days in Egypt, God repeated His overarching purpose which was to demonstrate that He is the Lord, the powerful, to make His name resound through all the Earth (Exodus 9:16). God impressed upon this nation of His that He is their God who will free them from the harsh bonds of slavery. Millennia will go by before He associates slavery with sin and consequently with death, from which He ultimately intends to free His people, forever.


    And now let’s go cross the Red Sea.